in the clouds, thrive in life, goal setting, achieving goals, mindset

Upgrade Your Life: Achieve More in 2015 with this Mindset

in the clouds, thrive in life, goal setting, achieving goals, mindset

Upgrade Your Life: Achieve More in 2015 with this Mindset

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In preparing to write the blogs for this month, I looked back at the blog for January of 2014. As we are starting a New Year, dealing with the years goals is often appropriate and looking back on the goals from last year as well. So here is reporting time. Last year, there were goals set in the spiritual, mental, relational, physical and recreational side.
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 So here goes.

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 On the spiritual side, I focused on reading one book of the Bible at least once a month and from different versions as well as reading a commentary on that book. I can boast that I achieved my goal. The book I chose was the book of Matthew. I have read it multiple times and am finishing a commentary today by an author who lived in the 1800s. There are a variety of things that have jumped out at me regarding my faith and I have found this very rewarding. I hope to focus on one book again in 2015 and continue the study of the person of Jesus.
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On the mental side, my goal was to read one book a week. Success again. I have had the opportunity of going through some 55 books in a fairly broad range of topics and hopefully have learned and put into practice some of the things I have read. The goal for this year is the same. I am also taking courses to become certified as a Life and Academic Coach and should be finished mid year.
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On the relational side, I will admit falling down. I had a goal to observe the body language of those around me so as to be more sensitive to their needs. I didn’t do well on this one and am going to pursue it again this year.

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On the physical side, my goal was to maintain an exercise routine and lose a few pounds. Partial success. I have maintained the routine and added to it by riding my bike 2 hours each Saturday morning before the rest of my family gets up. I failed to lose the pounds. Goal is to maintain that routine.

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On the recreational side, I had hoped to become familiar with Bach. No go. Had good intentions but failed to follow through by reviewing the goal and setting up times to do it. Goal for 2015 on the recreation side is to go paragliding at least once and start to learn about this fantastic sport. (I have a secret desire to fly and this is as close as I think I will get to it!) So off we go.

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Action Time.

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What about your goals? If you are considering setting goals for the year, consider the areas I have mentioned. I would have you consider goals that are dependent solely on your activity. For example, if you are a student, consider setting goals for progressing in how you learn and not on the grades you earn. Grades are dependent on your efforts and the input of your teacher. You can control your efforts. Your grade may be dependent on a teacher’s opinion. That is something you can’t control. If you are in business, set your goals on activities and adjust the activities to meet the employers’ requirements and/or your personal career goals. If you are a parent, set goals for the activities you want to do and the lessons you desire to teach.

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The mindset is to do your part. Your personal identity or achievement shouldn’t be dependent on the results.   Write them down, carry them with you and review regularly. I would look forward to hearing some of the goals you set and working with you to be accountable toward reaching them.
Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto
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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

 

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How to overcome Your Learned Fear

The key to overcoming your learned fear

 How to offset your learned fear response

learned fear, scared boy, fear of public speaking

Growing up in an Italian family, one of my favorite meals was stuffed artichokes.  My mother would make a breaded stuffing, push it down between the artichoke leaves, steam cook the artichoke and it became one of the courses of the meal.  I remember enjoying eating the stuffing and the bottom of the outer petals but most of all, I enjoyed the   artichoke heart.  I had to clear away the inner petals and what is called the choke.  But put some salt on the heart and I would consume it.  One day, being a little kid, I ate this favorite meal and then for some reason developed a sour stomach. The contents of my stomach went up rather than down.  My mind associated that discomfort with the artichokes and I didn’t touch them for years.
Sometimes our fears are learned in the same way.  Sometimes fears are reasonable.  It is reasonable to fear jumping out of a plane at 13,000 feet without a parachute.  On the other hand, doing so with a qualified instructor and a certified chute is one of the most exhilarating experiences I have had.  Unreasonable fears are often based on beliefs generated from prior actions and they can be overcome.

Action Time!

The rule of thumb is that when you fall off a bike or horse, it is important to get back on quickly to offset the learned fear response.  I often find some of these old remedies become common sense but actually were the observation of a skilled eye or many skilled eyes over many generations.  It holds true here.  If the conditions are really safe and the incident was just an incident, then getting back in the saddle as soon as possible is a means of overcoming learned fear.
Sometimes the solution is to slowly overcome the fear by taking “baby steps.” (Think about What About Bob (movie).  This is mindfully identifying an issue, setting out a plan to gradually get you out of this rut one small step at a time. Experiment with the step size.  Find a small one that works and reward yourself.  Tell a close friend what you are doing and gather some support.  It will build the relationship and move you closer to a goal (win-win!). The process also generates a new path in your brain that you can come back to when the situation arises.  I would look forward to hearing about the issue and what you have done to overcome it.
Did you like this article?  ”Like” it or “Share” it to motivate others. And don’t forget to like me on Facebook>> “Coach Rossitto

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To Your Success!

Coach Rossitto

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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC

The LPL Financial Registered Representatives associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

 

 

A Healthier Way to Vent

Why Venting is bad for your brain

Find Your Alternative to a Venting Rant

little boy, tantrum

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I recently picked up a copy of Tony Dungys’ book, Quiet Strength.  (I mentioned earlier my year’s goal is 26 books. This is #22 and it’s July :).  Tony tells a story of his youth and his venting about a referees’ call while playing in a basketball game.  He offers the nature of the conversation with his dad that pursued.   Dad: Did it change the call?  Answer:  No. Dad: Did it add anything to the situation?  Answer: No, but it felt good. His dad, Dr. Dungy, offers some additional comments that I will leave for you to enjoy when you pick up the book.  Psychologists indicate that venting actually has a negative impact on our brain.  Once we choose to use the venting process, we will choose that path again and often with more intensity in order to achieve a similar level of satisfaction. Other aggressive actions not directed at the immediate issue (like physical exercise) have the same impact on the brain as does the venting process.  When we get into that mold, our brain will take us there over and over again.

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Action Time!

Think about the last time you vented about something.  Is the event something that reoccurs?   If so, what is it?  Record what is setting you off to look for a pattern.  Also, based on your values, how do you want to respond?  Make up a short plan as to what actions you want to take and then practice them a few times by yourself and then with someone else.  Practice a few more times.  Next time, when the issue comes up, go into this autopilot routine and avoid the “vent.”  How does it feel?  Isn’t it nice to be in flow and going down your path to goals rather than venting off course, letting someone or thing control where you go?  Each time you win a small battle like treat yourself to a small reward.  So now let me hear from you. What is  your situation? What plan will you come up with?  Do you need some input?
Did you like this article?  ”Like” it or “Share” it to motivate others. And don’t forget to like me on Facebook>> “Coach Rossitto

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To Your Success!

Coach Rossitto

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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC

The LPL Financial Registered Representatives associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX