college aid- negotiation- college- prep

How to Appeal a College’s Financial Aid to Receive More

college aid- negotiation- college- prep

How to Appeal a College’s Financial Aid to Receive More

Dealing with a Low Ball Offer

This month, we have been going over various types of grants. The last part of this series is perhaps the most important. It has to do with getting schools to compete for you after they have sent a formal offer. The bottom line is you can appeal to the school for more money. This can happen in a couple of different ways. The first is due to hardship. If your family has experienced some financial hardship in the last year that makes the Free Application for Student AID (FAFSA) unrepresentative of your current circumstances, you can appeal to the financial aid officer and present your case. Bear in mind that these have to be legitimate family issues; a parent that was recently laid off their job, a sickness in the family, or some other valid reason. Vet bills for your favorite horse probably don’t apply. Financial officers have the ability and discression to adjust expenses due to out of the ordinary new circumstances. They are people too and have a heart.
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The second appeal is to simply ask for more dollars. Schools can and do low ball their first offers. There is information available that estimates the average percentage of “need” that a college will provide. If the figure you receive is significantly below that average for you as a student, the school is attempting to low ball you. In this case, you can go back to the college and indicate that their offer is below what you believe you can afford and thus ask them to sweeten the pot. If you are a student they want to fill their seats, they are often willing to do so. It never hurts to ask.
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The last appeal is based on competition. If you have a school that wants you and you want to go there but another school is offering a better package, tell the lower bidder. Explain the situation. Express the fact that you would like to go to their school but have other offers from other quality schools that are more cost effective. Provide the low bidder the details of the offer and ask them to meet it. If they want you and the offer is truly competitive, you may be surprised to see how the low bidder will work to get you into their school. Worst case is they won’t do it. Best case is they can up the grant and save you significant dollars.
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Action time.

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College education is a business, a big one. It works like a business in its dealings. While not quite the same as the corner used car lot, there are issues to be considered in reducing your costs and trying to obtain the best deal and still receive a quality education. I would look forward to working with you to help you receive the best value for your education dollar. Feel free to email me of give my office a call for an initial consultation.
Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto

 

 

 

 

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

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Financial Aid: Figuring out What you are Actually Paying for College

college entrance

Financial Aid: Figuring out What You are Actually Paying for College

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This month, we have talked about College Financial AID and how the numbers are worked up. We have been dealing with what is called “Need” and what kind of aid is available to fill this gap. Last week, we talked about government aid. This week, we will briefly discuss grants available from the colleges themselves.
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Grants usually come in the form of “Merit” based aid. Merit aid goes to students that the colleges or universities are targeting to add to their student body. This typically goes to students that work on positioning the 5 different college entrance requirements: high school grades, SAT scores, extracurricular activities, letters of recommendation and the college entrance essay. For the students that meet these entrance hurdles, colleges can target certain students in the upper qualification echelon with a percentage of aid to meet their “Need.” (Bear in mind that the family still has to pay the Effective Family Contribution (EFC)). So, when you receive offers from the universities or colleges, their grants will be working on this perceived “Need.”
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Here is where you have to be careful regarding the award letters. As mentioned earlier, some letters do not have very accurate Cost of Attendance figures, making the real cost higher then what they send you. Other offers with wrap in various student loans as part of the offer so it becomes important to read the fine print to see exactly what real money is coming out of the schools’ pocket and what will ultimately come out of your pocket and then make a comparison between the schools you are looking at. You may find that one offer that appears to look equal to another has a bottom line that actually has you paying more dollars due to various loans and work programs. Next week we will mention some ways to attempt to get the schools to up the grant.
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 Action Time.

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As you receive offers from schools, make a spread sheet that deals with what you believe is the real cost of attendance, your EFC, the perceived need, the actual grant from the college, the loans that need to be taken out, the contributions based on work-study programs and any other values that you believe you may experience and then calculate how much the real cost for each school. Now you will have a valid cost comparison. I would be glad to review the offers you receive and see how they compare.

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Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto

 

 

 

 

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

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Avoid this Mistake in your College Financial Planning

Avoid this Mistake in your College Financial Planning

Avoid this Mistake in your College Financial  Planning

Avoid this Mistake in your College Financial Planning

Every now and again, I respond to questions asked of another blog site. One of the recent questions posted came from the parent of a junior in High School. The just of the question was concern over costs of college and the impact of borrowing $10,000 from the equity of their home to give to a stock broker and in doing so the impact on the FAFSA form. Now, this blog is not one to give investment advice, so let’s put that on the table up front. And, the examples we talk about are specific, may be hypothetical and probably aren’t the same as what you personally might experience. Best of all, they aren’t a guarantee of future performance or your own success. Having said all that legal stuff, let’s consider some of the issues.

When you borrow money, you have to pay interest. Let’s assume the interest rate is 5%. So, just to break even, you have to make at least 5% plus the brokers fees for investing the money cause he ain’t gonna do it for nothing. Now, the stock has to go up for you to win, then he has to sell it for you to profit and he gets a fee for selling it. Then you pay taxes in the range of 0% to 35%, depending on your tax bracket and how long you own the stock. That’s if the stock goes up. What if it goes down? OOPs! Now you have to pay back the loan with dollars that you otherwise could have used to pay for college. So far, this is a risky expensive deal.

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Now, let’s look at the impact on the FAFSA form (Free Application for Student Aid). FASFA and is an estimate of the parent’s and/or student’s ability to pay for post secondary education. It generates something called the Effective Family Contribution, EFC, which is the U.S. government’s attempt to determine how much a family can afford for college and any eligibility for student aid from either the state or federal government or the schools themselves. Parents have to declare lots of assets. Home equity isn’t one of them. So, putting money into a brokerage account usually raises their Effective Family Contribution. It could be as high as 25% of the account value. That could raise their EFC by $2500. That means reducing their College Aid by $2500/year. Sounding worse as we go. Now, let’s say they are fortunate enough to make a profit and they sell it. The gain is considered income and causes the income part of the FAFSA to go up or as they make a profit but don’t sell it, the whole value of the account is causing their effective family contribution to go up $0.25 for every $1 they make. What that could mean is they have to make a 30% return each year to offset the cost of the interest and the impact on the FAFSA score. Do you know any place that can guarantee 30%/year without any risk? If so please let me know.

Action Time.

Planning for college is a complex progress. Sometimes we have the best of intentions but shoot ourselves in the foot. For this person, that appears to be the case. A couple of options are available. One would be to make use of some of the various cost calculators that various sites offer and input the data with and without the money in the brokerage account and see what the EFC turns out to be.   If there is an increase in the EFC, calculate that into the return you would have to make including the interest charge just to break even. That offers a reasonable picture as to the risk. If the return is pretty high, an alternative may be to use the equity to pay the college bill and pay the loan off over time. This doesn’t impact the FAFSA or any student aid and may offer some tax deductions, based on their personal situation. If your path is somewhat muddy, I would look forward to hearing about your circumstances and seeing how I might be of assistance.

Examples presented in material are meant for illustrative and or informational purposes only, and not indicative of any specific investment product. Individual circumstances will vary. Please see your investment and/or tax professional regarding education planning.

 

Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto
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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

 

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Paying for College: Plan for Success

college-guys-sweatshirts

Paying for College: Which College is Your Best Fit?

Sometimes in the stock market, the closing price on a stock one day is significantly different then the opening price the following day. It can be up or down and is called gapping up or gapping down. Now this isn’t a blog for investment advice so don’t think I am giving it to you. We do talk about life issues and college planning so I thought I’d add that random comment to set you up for a concept in the cost of college called “Gapping.”
So, here it is.
Let’s say you have been a diligent camper and searched out the cost of your dream school. The cost for classes, room, board and other expenses is $47,532. You have gone to a Cost Calculator and estimated your Effective Family Contribution to be $14,532. That’s the amount the government says your family can afford. You have great grades and know that you are potentially eligible for $20,000 of merit based aid. You qualify for government loans of $6,000 and you are willing to participate in a work study program that will generate another $4000. So here’s the math: $47,532 – ($14,532+$20,000+$6000+$4000) =$3000. The $3000 is the gap that you have to come up with on top of the $14,352 of EFC and the $6000 of government loans and the $4000 of work study. This school is gonna cost some $27,000 of out the pocket of somebody close to you. And that is each year!
Well, there are some schools that can be more generous. (They are also harder to get into!) They will, through merit and need based grants, and your families’ EFC eliminate the Gap.
There is a great site, www.collegeboard.com that allows you to search for information about college costs. One of the outputs is the percentage of students that have their full need met. If this number is fairly high, you can be fairly assured that you won’t get “Gapped.” If it is low, you might look elsewhere for a better deal.

 Action Time.

Paying for college is a daunting thing. Like anything else, it’s important to have a process and put in the effort. At least two things can happen. You’ll be satisfied in the deal you find and if you work hard while in college you will get a good education and feel good success. Now, ain’t that brilliant!
We have a process and I would look forward to sharing it with you. Check out our website at www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com for more information. Let me know how I can be of service.
Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto
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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX