brain-exercise brain-power

Train Yourself to Override Negative Thoughts with One Brain Exercise

brain-exercise brain-power

Train Yourself to Override Negative Thoughts with One Brain Exercise

There is a section of psychology that focuses on rewards. Most of us are familiar with the process that a psychologist used to train dogs. Pavlov used a treat to reward a dog for accomplishing a task. In the process of giving the dog the treat, he would add some audible command. Eventually the dog would mentally transfer the reward with the command. The end result is the dog responded to the command without the reward. The poor dog would get to the point of drooling at the command yet never get the treat.
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We do the same thing. We quickly mentally associate something with some physical event. As an example, when you throw up after eating some food, next time you see that food, you mentally revert back to the bad experience and refuse the food. It may have been your favorite and the event had nothing to do with the food but you turn it down.
Here’s the big deal. You can choose to eat the food anyway and continue to enjoy that tasty morsel. After a while, your brain will stop reminding you of the bad deal. You can choose to overwrite a distasteful event with something pleasurable. Or you can yield to what your brain is telling you and miss out on the benefits and mentally reinforce that wrong association.

Action time.

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You can use this deal to your benefit. Think of one of the most positive experiences you had. For me it is skydiving. Now, associate that with something important to you, some value you want to remember. Work hard to mentally associate these two things together. Next, take this association and connect it to some small physical action. An easy one is to pinch the skin between your thumb and index finger. Mentally keep working these three associations together. Some call this process setting an anchor or cue.
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After you have set this cue, think of something all together different; say the last two numbers of your phone number.  Now, quickly do the cue. See if the mental image doesn’t come back and override the distraction. This is a great process.
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Why bother? Well, next time you get into a stressful situation, use the cue to override the stress to get back to where you mentally want to be. Check it out! I would look forward to hearing your cue and how you use it. I would enjoy working with you to use cueing and other mental exercises to help you accelerate you being all you have been created to be.

 

 

 

 

Come over to our website specifically designed for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com
To Jump Starting Your College Life!
Coach Rossitto

 

 

 

 

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.
Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC
The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX
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becoming faster

How to get your brain to perform faster

becoming faster

Practice Makes Faster: How To Get Your Brain To Perform Faster

Physics guys will tell you something is out of whack when coaches tell a batter to keep their eyes on the ball. If you have to do the calculations of the time for the ball to leave the pitchers hand, you to focus on it, calculate where it will be and where to swing, it’s too late. The ball is in the catcher’s glove. That is what you observe when you see someone who has never swung at a ball step up to the plate and try to hit the thing. The same can be said of practicing a piano piece. A complex piano piece requires some 1800 keys to be struck in the course of a minute. In the same sense as the baseball batter, if the pianist was playing for a concert and had to mentally tell each of her fingers to hit the keys, the audience would be long gone. (For some of you musicians, you might take a moment to thank your parents for sitting through some of your recitals when playing notes was a long drawn out ordeal!) At times (like taking course tests and standardized tests) IQ is measured not only in the amount of information, how it is applied, but also in how quickly it is exhibited. The concept of practice is critical not only for the gathering of information but also its quick release at the appropriate time. The way our brains are wired, the more often we lay the practice down, the firing in our brain becomes specialized, more precise and more rapid and even predictive. This is what allows the batter and the pianist to deliver in a timely fashion
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Action Time

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I have mentioned Dr. Ben Carson; a gifted neuron surgeon who came from a very disadvantaged background and overcame his surroundings through reading. In his reading, he immersed himself in the topic of interest and became over saturated with information and thus raised his expertise and his IQ! As you study or practice, immerse yourself in the stuff. Gather sources, sift out the basic concepts and practice on the details. Chase it from different angles. You will see the power of your amazing brain take over and you will become fast, so fast you will experience “flow” and you will be exhilarated in the accomplishment. I would look forward to hearing your practice and experience.
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By the way, check out our new additional website specifically for college preparation.
www.lifeprepcollegeplanning.com

 

To Jump Starting Your College Life!

Coach Rossitto

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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC

The LPL Financial Registered Representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Improve Your Memory

Need Help Remembering?

Simple Strategy Game to Help Boost your Memory

man with post-it notes on head

Google image

We have talked about how our brain and our body are different from our mind.  So, if we learn how our brain functions and learn skills that help us use our brain better, we win big time.  If we practice those learned skills, we can wow ourselves and benefit others in the process. One function our brain uses is pictures.  If you are asked to think of a rose, most will mentally view a picture of their favorite colored rose.  Our brain pulls the picture and sometimes an emotion or story associated with the picture out of a file cabinet in our brain and we envision a rose.  So what’s the big deal?  Well here it is.  If you want to remember something, make a mental picture of the object (remember picture?), develop an emotional short story (remember sensation?) and then store it in some obvious fixed place (file cabinet).  If you want to keep that memory long-term, review the picture with the sensation in the file cabinet one hour later, than a day later and then a week later.  It will be yours, and with practice, for quite some time.

 Action Time!

Going to the store? Try the process.  Make a mental picture of the item and put some humor into it.  Store the mental picture and emotion in cabinet places on your body.  Here are some cabinet suggestions:  your feet, your knees, your thighs, your rear, your lungs, your shoulders, your ears, your face, the top of your head and one last one, the ceiling.  That is ten places. Now, go to the store and look at your feet.  What happened?  Your lungs?  What happened?  If it works (and I know it will) with practice, what other setting can you use the process? Write down your experiences and successes and tell me about it.
Did you like this article?  ”Like” it or “Share” it to motivate others. And don’t forget to like me on Facebook>> “Coach Rossitto

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To Your Success!

Coach Rossitto

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The opinions voiced in this material are for general information and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Securities and Advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor.  Member FINRA/SIPC

The LPL Financial Registered Representatives associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, MD, NY. TX